At D.C. march, families decry ‘two systems of justice’

WASHINGTON (AP) — Standing on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial, where the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. famously laid out a vision for harmony between white and Black people 57 years ago, his son issued a sobering reminder about the persistence of police brutality and racist violence targeting Black Americans.

“We must never forget the American nightmare of racist violence exemplified when Emmett Till was murdered on this day in 1955, and the criminal justice system failed to convict his killers,” said Martin Luther King III, speaking to thousands who gathered Friday to commemorate the 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom.

“Sixty-five years later (after Till’s murder), we still struggle for justice — demilitarizing the police, dismantling mass incarceration, and declaring as determinately as we can that Black lives matter,” King said.

Even in the midst of the coronavirus pandemic, many felt compelled to join civil rights advocates in Washington to highlight a scourge of police and vigilante violence that gave way to what many feel is an overdue reckoning on racial injustice. Some stood in sweltering temperatures in lines that stretched for several blocks, as organizers took temperatures as part of coronavirus protocols. Organizers reminded attendees to practice social distancing and wear masks throughout the program, although distancing was hardly maintained as the gathering grew in size.

They gathered following another shooting by a white police officer of a Black man — this time, 29-year-old Jacob Blake in Kenosha, Wisconsin, last Sunday — sparking demonstrations and violence that left two dead. As peaceful protests turned to arson and theft, naysayers of the Black Lives Matter movement issued calls for “law and order.”

The Rev. Al Sharpton, whose civil rights organization, the National Action Network, planned Friday’s commemoration, had a message for naysayers.

“Some say to me, ‘Rev. Al, y’all ought to denounce those that get violent, those that are looting,’” Sharpton said. “All of the families (of victims of police and vigilante violence) have denounced looting. What we haven’t heard is you denounce shooting.”

Sharpton asked, “We will speak against the looting, but when will you speak against wrong police shooting?”

Sharpton and King stood with relatives of an ever-expanding roll call of victims: Blake, George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, Rayshard Brooks, Ahmaud Arbery, Trayvon Martin, and Eric Garner, among others.

Arbery and Martin both were killed by men who pursued them with guns and whose arrests were delayed until residents protested.

“There are two systems of justice in the United States,” said Jacob Blake Sr., the father of the man whose shooting by police in Kenosha left him paralyzed from the waist down. “There’s a white system and a black system — the black system ain’t doing so well.”

“No justice, no peace!” he proclaimed.

Philonise Floyd, the brother of George Floyd, stared out at the massive march audience and said he wished his brother was there to see it.

Friday’s march shaped up to be the largest political gathering in Washington since the pandemic began. Many attendees wore T-shirts of the late Rep. John Lewis who, until his death last month, was the last living speaker at the original March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. That march went on to become one of the most famous political rallies in U.S. history, and one of the largest gatherings with over 200,000 people in attendance.

Organizers said they intended to show the urgency for federal policing reforms, to decry racial violence, and to demand voting rights protections ahead of the November general election. A handful of satellite marches were held in South Carolina, Florida, Nevada, Utah and Colorado.

Democratic vice presidential nominee Kamala Harris, in a video, said the original conveners would be disappointed that Black Americans are still marching for justice and equality under the law.

“I have to believe that if they were with us today, they would share in our anger and frustration as we continue to see Black men and women slain in our streets, and left behind in our economy and justice system that has too often denied Black folks our dignity and rights,” she said.

Former Vice President Joe Biden tweeted his support for the march.

Although President Donald Trump did not comment on the march Friday, the Republican National Committee marked the event’s anniversary by highlighting the president’s record as a “champion for the Black community.”

“While there is more work to be done, Donald Trump is the leader to make it happen,” Paris Dennard, an RNC senior communications advisor, said in a statement.

Activist Frank Nitty, who said he walked 750 miles for 24 days from Milwaukee, Wisconsin, to Washington for Friday’s march, spoke to the audience about persistence in the fight for justice.

“Are y’all tired? Because I’m tired,” Nitty said. “They think this is a negotiation, but I came here to demand change. My grandson ain’t gonna march for the same things that my granddaddy marched for.”

Navy veteran Alonzo Jones-Goss, 28, who traveled from Boston to participate in the march, said the nation has seen far too many tragic events that claimed the lives of Black Americans and other people of color, and “that needs to come to an end.”

Following the rally, participants marched to the Martin Luther King Jr. memorial in West Potomac Park, next to the National Mall, and then dispersed. Some participants headed toward Black Lives Matter Plaza, right outside of the White House, which was renamed from Pennsylvania Avenue during protests in June.

Chants of “Black lives matter” and “No justice, no peace” echoed through downtown Salt Lake City Friday morning, as about 200 people marched from the state Capitol to Washington Square Park for Utah’s March on Washington.

“If people still can’t see why we’re out here and why we’re marching and why people are loud and angry then they’re blind,” said Joshua Chamberlain, a realtor from Holladay, Utah. “There’s racism happening every day and — especially by police brutality — people are dying from it.”

In Colorado, several dozen people rallied at a prominent statue of Martin Luther King Jr. in Denver’s City Park. Democratic U.S. Sen. Michael Bennet cited the names of George Floyd, Elijah McClain and victims of police brutality.

“You know and I know what happened to them would never happen to me,” said Bennet, who is white.

Sharpton instructed those in other states to march on their U.S. senators’ offices and demand their support for federal policing reforms and reinvigorated voter protections, in Lewis’ memory.

In June, the Democrat-controlled House of Representatives passed the George Floyd Justice In Policing Act, which would ban police use of stranglehold maneuvers and end qualified immunity for officers, among other reforms. A Republican-authored police reform bill, introduced in June by South Carolina Sen. Tim Scott, who is Black, failed a procedural vote in the Senate because Democrats felt the measure didn’t go far enough to address officer accountability.

In July, following Lewis’ death, Democratic senators reintroduced legislation that would restore a provision of the historic Voting Rights Act of 1965 gutted by the U.S. Supreme Court in 2013. The law previously required states with a history of voter suppression to seek federal clearance before changing voting regulations.

Both measures are awaiting action in the Republican-controlled Senate.

___

Aaron Morrison reported from New York. Kat Stafford and Ashraf Khalil reported from Washington, and journalists from across the AP contributed to this report. Morrison and Stafford are members of the AP’s Race and Ethnicity team.

Copyright © 2020 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, written or redistributed.

Related Categories:

Government News | Local News | National News
march on washington
WASHINGTON, DC – AUGUST 28: Rev. Al Sharpton, Yolanda Renee King, Arndrea Waters King and Martin Luther King, III begin their march from from the Lincoln Memorial to the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial August 28, 2020 in Washington, DC. Today marks the 57th anniversary of Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.’s “I Have A Dream” speech. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

march on washington
A marcher walks past banners and signs at Black Lives Matter Plaza near the White House in Washington, during the March on Washington, Friday, Aug. 28, 2020, commemorating the 57th anniversary of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.’s “I Have A Dream” speech. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

march on washington
WASHINGTON, DC – AUGUST 28: Participants in the March on Washington conclude their march from the Lincoln Memorial to the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial August 28, 2020 in Washington, DC. Today marks the 57th anniversary of Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.’s “I Have A Dream” speech. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

march on washington
People participate in the March on Washington, Friday, Aug. 28, 2020, at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, on the 57th anniversary of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.’s “I Have A Dream” speech. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)

march on washington
People carry posters with George Floyd on them as they march from the Lincoln Memorial to the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial during the March on Washington, Friday Aug. 28, 2020, in Washington. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

march on washington
People participate in the March on Washington, Friday, Aug. 28, 2020, at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, on the 57th anniversary of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.’s “I Have A Dream” speech. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)

(AP/Julio Cortez)
march on washington
WASHINGTON, DC – AUGUST 28: Attendees participate in the March on Washington at the Lincoln Memorial August 28, 2020 in Washington, DC. Today marks the 57th anniversary of Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.’s “I Have A Dream” speech at the same location. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

march on washington
WASHINGTON, DC – AUGUST 28: Participants in the March on Washington conclude their march from the Lincoln Memorial to the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial August 28, 2020 in Washington, DC. Today marks the 57th anniversary of Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.’s “I Have A Dream” speech. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

march on washington
WASHINGTON, DC – AUGUST 28: Participants in the March on Washington conclude their march from the Lincoln Memorial to the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial August 28, 2020 in Washington, DC. Today marks the 57th anniversary of Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.’s “I Have A Dream” speech. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

march on washington
WASHINGTON, DC – AUGUST 28: Philonise Floyd, brother of George Floyd, speaks during the March on Washington at the Lincoln Memorial August 28, 2020 in Washington, DC. Today marks the 57th anniversary of Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.’s “I Have A Dream” speech at the same location. (Photo by Jacquelyn Martin-Pool/Getty Images)

march on washington
WASHINGTON, DC – AUGUST 28: Attendees participate in the March on Washington at the Lincoln Memorial August 28, 2020 in Washington, DC. Today marks the 57th anniversary of Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.’s “I Have A Dream” speech at the same location. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

march on washington
Terri Biley, of Los Angeles, stands at The Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial during the March on Washington, Friday Aug. 28, 2020, in Washington, on the 57th anniversary of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.’s “I Have A Dream” speech. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

march on washington
WASHINGTON, DC – AUGUST 28: Jacob Blake Sr., father of Jacob Blake, speaks during the March on Washington at the Lincoln Memorial August 28, 2020 in Washington, DC. Today marks the 57th anniversary of Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.’s “I Have A Dream” speech at the same location. (Photo by Jacquelyn Martin-Pool/Getty Images)

march on washington
WASHINGTON, DC – AUGUST 28: Attendees participate in the March on Washington at the Lincoln Memorial August 28, 2020 in Washington, DC. Today marks the 57th anniversary of Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.’s “I Have A Dream” speech at the same location. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

march on washington
People pose for a photo in the Reflecting Pool in the shadow of the Washington Monument as they attend the March on Washington, Friday, Aug. 28, 2020, at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, on the 57th anniversary of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.’s “I Have A Dream” speech. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)

march on washington
WASHINGTON, DC – AUGUST 28: Rev. Al Sharpton, founder and president of National Action Network, speaks during the March on Washington at the Lincoln Memorial August 28, 2020 in Washington, DC. Today marks the 57th anniversary of Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.’s “I Have A Dream” speech at the same location. (Photo by Jacquelyn Martin-Pool/Getty Images)

march on washington
WASHINGTON, DC – AUGUST 28: Attendees at the National Action Network Commitment March at the Lincoln Memorial on August 28, 2020 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Shannon Finney/Getty Images)

march on washington
People participate in the March on Washington, Friday, Aug. 28, 2020, at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, on the 57th anniversary of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.’s “I Have A Dream” speech. Behind is the U.S. Capitol. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)

march on washington
WASHINGTON, DC – AUGUST 28: Rev. Al Sharpton, founder and president of National Action Network, speaks during the March on Washington at the Lincoln Memorial August 28, 2020 in Washington, DC. Today marks the 57th anniversary of Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.’s “I Have A Dream” speech at the same location. (Photo by Jacquelyn Martin-Pool/Getty Images)

march on washington
A man stands in the Reflecting Pool as people attend the March on Washington, Friday Aug. 28, 2020, in Washington, on the 57th anniversary of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.’s “I Have A Dream” speech. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

march on washington
Audrey Dimartinez stands with her grand daughter Eliysia Leber as they listen to speakers during the March on Washington, Friday Aug. 28, 2020, in Washington, on the 57th anniversary of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.’s “I Have A Dream” speech. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

march on washington
WASHINGTON, DC – AUGUST 28: Martin Luther King III speaks alongside Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee (D-TX) during the March on Washington at the Lincoln Memorial August 28, 2020 in Washington, DC. Today marks the 57th anniversary of Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.’s “I Have A Dream” speech at the same location. (Photo by Jacquelyn Martin-Pool/Getty Images)

march on washington
A Black Lives Matter flag is waved by a demonstrator outside of the Lincoln Memorial during the Commitment March. (WTOP/Alejandro Alvarez)

march on washington
People participate in the March on Washington, Friday, Aug. 28, 2020, at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, on the 57th anniversary of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.’s “I Have A Dream” speech. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)

WASHINGTON, DC – AUGUST 28: People gather around the reflecting pool during the March on Washington at the Lincoln Memorial August 28, 2020 in Washington, DC. Today marks the 57th anniversary of Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.’s “I Have A Dream” speech at the same location. (Photo by Jacquelyn Martin-Pool/Getty Images)

Wearing a mask similar to those worn by doctors during the Black Plague outbreak centuries ago, this demonstrator makes a statement about race’s place in American history. (WTOP/Alejandro Alvarez)

march on washington
WASHINGTON, DC – AUGUST 28: Yolanda Renee King, granddaughter of Martin Luther King Jr., speaks alongside her parents Arndrea Waters King and Martin Luther King III during the March on Washington at the Lincoln Memorial August 28, 2020 in Washington, DC. Today marks the 57th anniversary of Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.’s “I Have A Dream” speech at the same location. (Photo by Jacquelyn Martin-Pool/Getty Images)

march on washington
People attend the March on Washington, Friday, Aug. 28, 2020, at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, on the 57th anniversary of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.’s “I Have A Dream” speech. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)

march on washington
A few attendees of the Commitment March listen to the speakers who are positioned on top of the steps to the Lincoln Memorial. (WTOP/Alejandro Alvarez)

A marcher wearing a pig nose raises her fist in solidarity during the Commitment March. (WTOP/Alejandro Alvarez)

march on washington
Demonstrators hold up signs just outside of the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C. (WTOP/Alejandro Alvarez)

march on washington
People listen to speakers during the March on Washington, Friday Aug. 28, 2020, at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, on the 57th anniversary of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.’s “I Have A Dream” speech in Washington, Friday, Aug. 28, 2020. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

march on washington
Two attendees of the Commitment March make street art along the National Mall. (WTOP/John Domen)

march on washington
People attending the March on Washington, have their temperatures taken before entering the area, Friday, Aug. 28, 2020, at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, on the 57th anniversary of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.’s “I Have A Dream” speech. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)

Demonstrators at the Commitment March show off their signs while also donning shirts in support of Joe Biden’s presidential run. (WTOP/John Domen)

Rep. Al Green, D-Texas, waits to speak at the March on Washington, Friday Aug. 28, 2020, at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, on the 57th anniversary of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.’s “I Have A Dream” speech. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin, Pool)

A sign quoting author and Holocaust survivor Elie Wiesel is held up by a demonstrator. (WTOP/John Domen)

WASHINGTON, DC – AUGUST 28: Members of the cast of Bravo’s “Married to Medicine” attend the 2020 March on Washington, officially known as the “Commitment March: Get Your Knee Off our Necks,” at the Lincoln Memorial on August 28, 2020 in Washington, DC. The march coincides with the 57th anniversary of Martin Luther King, Jr.’s March on Washington, where he delivered his historic “I Have A Dream” speech in 1963. (Photo by Paul Morigi/Getty Images)

WASHINGTON, DC – AUGUST 28: An attendee listens to speeches at the 2020 March on Washington, officially known as the “Commitment March: Get Your Knee Off our Necks,” at the Lincoln Memorial on August 28, 2020 in Washington, DC. The march coincides with the 57th anniversary of Martin Luther King, Jr.’s March on Washington, where he delivered his historic “I Have A Dream” speech in 1963. (Photo by Paul Morigi/Getty Images)

A different angle at some of the wares that one demonstrator is making at the Commitment March. (WTOP/John Domen)

march on washington
Walter Carter, 74, of Gainesville, Fla., attends the March on Washington, Friday Aug. 28, 2020, at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, on the 57th anniversary of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.’s “I Have A Dream” speech. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

march on washington
WASHINGTON, DC – AUGUST 28: Mothers who lost their children to police killings line up to speak during the March on Washington at the Lincoln Memorial August 28, 2020 in Washington, DC. Today marks the 57th anniversary of Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.’s “I Have A Dream” speech at the same location. (Photo by Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images)

march on washington
People arrive and walk around the reflecting pool during the March on Washington, Friday Aug. 28, 2020, at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, on the 57th anniversary of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.’s “I Have A Dream” speech in Washington, Friday, Aug. 28, 2020. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

Demonstrators arrive on the National Mall for the “Commitment March: Get Your Knee Off Our Necks” protest against racism and police brutality, on August 28, 2020, in Washington DC. (Photo by Eric BARADAT / AFP) (Photo by ERIC BARADAT/AFP via Getty Images)

Megan Dogans of Denver, arrives to attend the March on Washington, Friday Aug. 28, 2020, at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, on the 57th anniversary of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.'s "I Have A Dream" speech. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)
Megan Dogans of Denver, arrives to attend the March on Washington, Friday Aug. 28, 2020, at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, on the 57th anniversary of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.’s “I Have A Dream” speech. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

(AP/Alex Brandon)
Activist Dominque Alexander of Dallas, speaks demonstrators gather at the Lincoln Memorial for the March on Washington, Friday Aug. 28, 2020, in Washington, on the 57th anniversary of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.’s “I Have A Dream” speech. (Michael M. Santiago/Pool via AP)

People listen to speakers at the Lincoln Memorial during the”Commitment March: Get Your Knee Off Our Necks” on August 28, 2020, in Washington DC.

WASHINGTON, DC – AUGUST 28: A woman leads a chant at the National Action Network Commitment March at the Lincoln Memorial on August 28, 2020 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Shannon Finney/Getty Images)

(Getty Images/SHANNONFINNEY)
WASHINGTON, DC – AUGUST 28: Demonstrators gather at the Lincoln Memorial for the “Get Your Knee Off Our Necks” March on Washington in support of racial justice on August 28, 2020 in Washington, DC. Today marks the 57th anniversary of Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.’s “I Have A Dream” speech at the same location. (Photo by Jonathan Ernst-Pool/Getty Images)

Demonstrators arrive on the National Mall for the “Commitment March: Get Your Knee Off Our Necks” protest against racism and police brutality, on August 28, 2020, in Washington DC. (Photo by ROBERTO SCHMIDT / AFP) (Photo by ROBERTO SCHMIDT/AFP via Getty Images)

march on washington
Demonstrators gather for the “Commitment March: Get Your Knee Off Our Necks” protest against racism and police brutality, at the National Mall on August 28, 2020, in Washington DC. (Photo by Eric BARADAT / AFP) (Photo by ERIC BARADAT/AFP via Getty Images)

Demonstrators gather for the “Commitment March: Get Your Knee Off Our Necks” protest against racism and police brutality, at the National Mall on August 28, 2020, in Washington DC. (Photo by Eric BARADAT / AFP) (Photo by ERIC BARADAT/AFP via Getty Images)

Shontina Kuykendoll of Dallas, attends the March on Washington, Friday Aug. 28, 2020, at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, on the 57th anniversary of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.’s “I Have A Dream” speech. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

Demonstrators arrive for the “Commitment March: Get Your Knee Off Our Necks” protest against racism and police brutality, at the Lincoln Memorial on August 28, 2020, in Washington DC. (Photo by Eric BARADAT / AFP) (Photo by ERIC BARADAT/AFP via Getty Images)

Chairs are set up near the Lincoln Memorial on Thursday Aug. 27, 2020, in Washington, prior to the March on Washington, which is being held on Friday at the Lincoln Memorial. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
Chairs are set up near the Lincoln Memorial on Thursday Aug. 27, 2020, in Washington, prior to the March on Washington, which is being held on Friday at the Lincoln Memorial. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

A man waves an American flag on top of the Lincoln Memorial ahead of the 2020 March on Washington.
A man waves an American flag on top of the Lincoln Memorial ahead of the 2020 March on Washington.

The early morning sun rises over the Washing ton Monument and the Reflecting Pool as final preparations are made for the March on Washington, Friday Aug. 28, 2020, at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, on the 57th anniversary of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.'s "I Have A Dream" speech. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
The early morning sun rises over the Washing ton Monument and the Reflecting Pool as final preparations are made for the March on Washington, Friday Aug. 28, 2020, at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, on the 57th anniversary of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.’s “I Have A Dream” speech. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

A crowd gathers at the Lincoln ahead of the march.

The Lincoln Memorial can be seen prior to Friday’s march. (WTOP/Kyle Cooper)

A grid has been set up to help with social distancing at the reflecting pool before the march. (WTOP/Kyle Cooper)

Bottles of water for the march are set out next to the reflecting pool. (WTOP/Kyle Cooper)

(1/64)
march on washington
march on washington
march on washington
march on washington
march on washington
march on washington
march on washington
march on washington
march on washington
march on washington
march on washington
march on washington
march on washington
march on washington
march on washington
march on washington
march on washington
march on washington
march on washington
march on washington
march on washington
march on washington
march on washington
march on washington
march on washington
march on washington
march on washington
march on washington
march on washington
march on washington
march on washington
march on washington
march on washington
march on washington
Megan Dogans of Denver, arrives to attend the March on Washington, Friday Aug. 28, 2020, at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, on the 57th anniversary of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.'s "I Have A Dream" speech. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)
march on washington
Chairs are set up near the Lincoln Memorial on Thursday Aug. 27, 2020, in Washington, prior to the March on Washington, which is being held on Friday at the Lincoln Memorial. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
A man waves an American flag on top of the Lincoln Memorial ahead of the 2020 March on Washington.
The early morning sun rises over the Washing ton Monument and the Reflecting Pool as final preparations are made for the March on Washington, Friday Aug. 28, 2020, at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, on the 57th anniversary of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.'s "I Have A Dream" speech. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

More from WTOP

Log in to your WTOP account for notifications and alerts customized for you.

Sign up