Slain Capitol Police officer honored: ‘We will never forget’

U.S. Capitol Police Officers pay their respects to fellow officer Brian Sicknick, who died from injuries sustained while protecting the Capitol Building during the January 6 attack, at the U.S. Capitol Rotunda on February 2, 2021 in Washington, DC. Sicknic's remains will lie in honor through tomorrow, and then be buried at Arlington National Cemetery.
Capitol Hill Police officers wait for the remains of Officer Brian Sicknick to arrive to lie in honor in the Rotunda of the US Capitol on February 2, 2021, in Washington, DC. - The US Capitol police officer who died after being injured in the January 6 attack by pro-Trump rioters will lie in honor at the building's Rotunda, a mark of respect rarely bestowed. Brian Sicknick was reportedly struck in the head with a fire extinguisher while struggling with the rioters who swarmed through the halls of Congress. (Photo by Tasos Katopodis / POOL / AFP)
Honor guards carry an urn with the cremated remains of US Capitol Police officer Brian Sicknick and a folded US National flag up the steps of the US Capitol to lie in honor in the Rotunda in Washington, DC, February 2, 2021. - US President Joe Biden paid his respects Tuesday at a solemn memorial to the policeman killed last month during an attack on the Capitol by Donald Trump's supporters. (Photo by Alex Brandon / POOL / AFP)
Members of the Capitol Police pay their respects to the late Capitol Police officer Brian Sicknick who lies in honor in the Rotunda of the US Capitol in Washington, DC on February 2, 2021. - The US Capitol police officer who died after being injured in the January 6 attack by pro-Trump rioters will lie in honor at the building's Rotunda, a mark of respect rarely bestowed. Brian Sicknick was reportedly struck in the head with a fire extinguisher while struggling with the rioters who swarmed through the halls of Congress. (Photo by erin schaff / POOL / AFP)
The honor guard salutes as U.S. Capitol Police officers pay their respects to fellow officer Brian D. Sicknick as he lies in honor in the U.S. Capitol on February 2, 2021 in Washington, DC. Officer Sicknick died as a result of injuries he sustained during the January 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol. He will lie in honor until February 3 and then be buried at Arlington National Cemetery.
President Joe Biden and First Lady Jill Biden pay their respects to the late Capitol Police Officer Brian Sicknick who lies in honor in the Rotunda of the Capitol in Washington, DC on February 2, 2021. - The US Capitol police officer who died after being injured in the January 6 attack by pro-Trump rioters will lie in honor at the building's Rotunda, a mark of respect rarely bestowed. Brian Sicknick was reportedly struck in the head with a fire extinguisher while struggling with the rioters who swarmed through the halls of Congress. (Photo by Erin Schaff / POOL / AFP)
President Joe Biden pays his respects to the late Capitol Police Officer Brian Sicknick who lies in honor in the Rotunda of the US Capitol in Washington, DC on February 2, 2021. - The US Capitol police officer who died after being injured in the January 6 attack by pro-Trump rioters will lie in honor at the building's Rotunda, a mark of respect rarely bestowed. Brian Sicknick was reportedly struck in the head with a fire extinguisher while struggling with the rioters who swarmed through the halls of Congress. (Photo by Erin Schaff / POOL / AFP)
Capitol Police Officers pay their respects to late US Capitol Police officer Brian Sicknick as he lies in honor in the US Capitol Rotunda in Washington, DC February 2, 2021. (Photo by Erin Schaff / POOL / AFP)
Family members arrive to pay their respects to US Capitol Police Officer Brian Sicknick as he lies in honor in the Rotunda of the US Capitol in Washington, DC, February 2, 2021. - The US Capitol police officer who died after being injured in the January 6 attack by pro-Trump rioters will lie in honor at the building's Rotunda, a mark of respect rarely bestowed. Brian Sicknick was reportedly struck in the head with a fire extinguisher while struggling with the rioters who swarmed through the halls of Congress. (Photo by LEAH MILLIS / POOL / AFP)
A U.S. Capitol Police officer pays respect to fellow officer Brian D. Sicknick as he lies in honor in the U.S. Capitol on February 2, 2021 in Washington, DC. Officer Sicknick died as a result of injuries he sustained during the January 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol. He will lie in honor until February 3 and then be buried at Arlington National Cemetery.
U.S. Capitol Police officer Brian D. Sicknick lies in honor in the U.S. Capitol on February 2, 2021 in Washington, DC. Officer Sicknick died as a result of injuries he sustained during the January 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol. He will lie in honor until February 3 and then be buried at Arlington National Cemetery.
A Capitol Police Officer salutes as he pays his respects to late US Capitol Police officer Brian Sicknick as he lies in honor in the US Capitol Rotunda in Washington, DC February 2, 2021. - The US Capitol police officer who died after being injured in the January 6 attack by pro-Trump rioters will lie in honor at the building's Rotunda, a mark of respect rarely bestowed. Brian Sicknick was reportedly struck in the head with a fire extinguisher while struggling with the rioters who swarmed through the halls of Congress. (Photo by Brendan Smialowski / POOL / AFP)
Capitol_Breach_Officer_Killed_88862 Vice President Kamala Harris and her husband Doug Emhoff pay respects to U.S. Capitol Police officer Brian Sicknick as an urn with his cremated remains lies in honor on a black-draped table at the center of the Capitol Rotunda, Wednesday, Feb. 3, 2021, in Washington.
Members of the National Guard salute as they pay their respects late US Capitol Police officer Brian Sicknick as he lies in honor in the US Capitol Rotunda in Washington, DC February 2, 2021. - The US Capitol police officer who died after being injured in the January 6 attack by pro-Trump rioters will lie in honor at the building's Rotunda, a mark of respect rarely bestowed. Brian Sicknick was reportedly struck in the head with a fire extinguisher while struggling with the rioters who swarmed through the halls of Congress. (Photo by Brendan Smialowski / POOL / AFP)
Capitol_Breach_Officer_Killed_53364 Vice President Kamala Harris and her husband Doug Emhoff arrive to pay respects to U.S. Capitol Police officer Brian Sicknick as an urn with his cremated remains lies in honor on a black-draped table at the center of the Capitol Rotunda, Wednesday, Feb. 3, 2021, in Washington.
A man kneels as he pays his respects to late US Capitol Police officer Brian Sicknick as he lies in honor in the US Capitol Rotunda in Washington, DC February 2, 2021. - The US Capitol police officer who died after being injured in the January 6 attack by pro-Trump rioters will lie in honor at the building's Rotunda, a mark of respect rarely bestowed. Brian Sicknick was reportedly struck in the head with a fire extinguisher while struggling with the rioters who swarmed through the halls of Congress. (Photo by Brendan Smialowski / POOL / AFP)
A member of the National Guard salutes as he pays his respects to late US Capitol Police officer Brian Sicknick as he lies in honor in the US Capitol Rotunda in Washington, DC February 2, 2021. - The US Capitol police officer who died after being injured in the January 6 attack by pro-Trump rioters will lie in honor at the building's Rotunda, a mark of respect rarely bestowed. Brian Sicknick was reportedly struck in the head with a fire extinguisher while struggling with the rioters who swarmed through the halls of Congress. (Photo by Brendan Smialowski / POOL / AFP)
Capitol_Breach_Officer_Killed_39005 Vice President Kamala Harris and her husband Doug Emhoff pay respects to U.S. Capitol Police officer Brian Sicknick as an urn with his cremated remains lies in honor on a black-draped table at the center of the Capitol Rotunda, Wednesday, Feb. 3, 2021, in Washington.
Members of the National Guard pay their respects to late US Capitol Police officer Brian Sicknick as he lies in honor in the US Capitol Rotunda in Washington, DC February 2, 2021. - The US Capitol police officer who died after being injured in the January 6 attack by pro-Trump rioters will lie in honor at the building's Rotunda, a mark of respect rarely bestowed. Brian Sicknick was reportedly struck in the head with a fire extinguisher while struggling with the rioters who swarmed through the halls of Congress. (Photo by Brendan Smialowski / POOL / AFP)
A police officer salutes as he pays respects to US Capitol Police officer Brian Sicknick as he lies in honor in the US Capitol Rotunda in Washington, DC February 2, 2021. - The US Capitol police officer who died after being injured in the January 6 attack by pro-Trump rioters will lie in honor at the building's Rotunda, a mark of respect rarely bestowed. Brian Sicknick was reportedly struck in the head with a fire extinguisher while struggling with the rioters who swarmed through the halls of Congress. (Photo by Brendan Smialowski / POOL / AFP)
Riot damage can be seen as Capitol Police officers prepare for the arrival of the remains of Capitol Police officer Brian Sicknick to lay in honor in the Rotunda of the US Capitol in Washington, DC February 2, 2021. - The US Capitol police officer who died after being injured in the January 6 attack by pro-Trump rioters will lie in honor at the building's Rotunda, a mark of respect rarely bestowed. Brian Sicknick was reportedly struck in the head with a fire extinguisher while struggling with the rioters who swarmed through the halls of Congress. (Photo by Brendan Smialowski / POOL / AFP)
Riot damage can be seen as Capitol Police officers prepare for the arrival of the remains of Capitol Police officer Brian Sicknick to lay in honor in the Rotunda of the US Capitol in Washington, DC February 2, 2021. - The US Capitol police officer who died after being injured in the January 6 attack by pro-Trump rioters will lie in honor at the building's Rotunda, a mark of respect rarely bestowed. Brian Sicknick was reportedly struck in the head with a fire extinguisher while struggling with the rioters who swarmed through the halls of Congress. (Photo by Brendan Smialowski / POOL / AFP)
The remains of Capitol Police officer Brian Sicknick lay in honor in the Rotunda of the US Capitol in Washington, DC February 2, 2021. - The US Capitol police officer who died after being injured in the January 6 attack by pro-Trump rioters will lie in honor at the building's Rotunda, a mark of respect rarely bestowed. Brian Sicknick was reportedly struck in the head with a fire extinguisher while struggling with the rioters who swarmed through the halls of Congress. (Photo by Brendan Smialowski / POOL / AFP)
The remains of Capitol Police officer Brian Sicknick lay in honor in the Rotunda of the US Capitol in Washington, DC February 2, 2021. - The US Capitol police officer who died after being injured in the January 6 attack by pro-Trump rioters will lie in honor at the building's Rotunda, a mark of respect rarely bestowed. Brian Sicknick was reportedly struck in the head with a fire extinguisher while struggling with the rioters who swarmed through the halls of Congress. (Photo by Brendan Smialowski / POOL / AFP)
The remains of Capitol Police officer Brian Sicknick lay in honor in the Rotunda of the US Capitol in Washington, DC February 2, 2021. - The US Capitol police officer who died after being injured in the January 6 attack by pro-Trump rioters will lie in honor at the building's Rotunda, a mark of respect rarely bestowed. Brian Sicknick was reportedly struck in the head with a fire extinguisher while struggling with the rioters who swarmed through the halls of Congress. (Photo by Brendan Smialowski / POOL / AFP)
Capitol_Breach_Officer_Killed_62055 A U.S. Capitol Police Officer holds a program during a ceremony memorializing U.S. Capitol Police officer Brian Sicknick, as an urn with his cremated remains lies in honor on a black-draped table at the center of the Capitol Rotunda, Wednesday, Feb. 3, 2021, in Washington.
Capitol_Breach_Officer_Killed_41607 U.S. Capitol Police Officers and other guests are seated during a ceremony memorializing U.S. Capitol Police officer Brian Sicknick, as an urn with his cremated remains lies in honor on a black-draped table at the center of the Capitol Rotunda, Wednesday, Feb. 3, 2021, in Washington.
Capitol_Breach_Officer_Killed_70605 Sen. Cory Booker, D-N.J., is seated during a ceremony memorializing U.S. Capitol Police officer Brian Sicknick, as an urn with his cremated remains lies in honor on a black-draped table at the center of the Capitol Rotunda, Wednesday, Feb. 3, 2021, in Washington.
Capitol_Breach_Officer_Killed_23279 District of Columbia Mayor Muriel Bowser, right, police officers and other guests are seated during a ceremony memorializing U.S. Capitol Police officer Brian Sicknick, as an urn with his cremated remains lies in honor on a black-draped table at the center of the Capitol Rotunda, Wednesday, Feb. 3, 2021, in Washington.
Capitol_Breach_Officer_Killed_87686 A U.S. Capitol Police Officer holds a program during a ceremony memorializing U.S. Capitol Police officer Brian Sicknick, as an urn with his cremated remains lies in honor on a black-draped table at the center of the Capitol Rotunda, Wednesday, Feb. 3, 2021, in Washington.
Capitol_Breach_Officer_Killed_86330 Sen. Elizabeth WarrenD-Mass., pays respects to the late U.S. Capitol Police officer Brian Sicknick as an urn with his cremated remains lies in honor on a black-draped table at the center of the Capitol Rotunda, Wednesday, Feb. 3, 2021, in Washington.
APTOPIX_Capitol_Breach_Officer_Killed_01267 U.S. Capitol Police officers on motorcycles ride ahead of a hearse carrying the remains of U.S. Capitol Police officer Brian Sicknick as it makes its way to Arlington National Cemetery after Sicknick was lying in honor at the U.S Capitol, Wednesday, Feb. 3, 2021, in Washington.
Capitol_Breach_Officer_Killed_61570 U.S. Capitol Police officers salute as an honor guard carry an urn with the cremated remains of U.S. Capitol Police officer Brian Sicknick down the steps of the U.S Capitol, Wednesday, Feb. 3, 2021, in Washington.
Capitol_Breach_Officer_Killed_41873 From left, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi of Calif., Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky, and House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy of Calif., walk outside to watch an honor guard carry an urn with the cremated remains of U.S. Capitol Police officer Brian Sicknick down the steps of the U.S Capitol, Wednesday, Feb. 3, 2021, in Washington.
Capitol_Breach_Officer_Killed_08859 A woman cries during a ceremony memorializing U.S. Capitol Police officer Brian Sicknick, as an urn with his cremated remains lies in honor on a black-draped table at the center of the Capitol Rotunda, Wednesday, Feb. 3, 2021, in Washington.
Capitol_Breach_Officer_Killed_75635 Family members watch as an honor guard carries an urn with the cremated remains of U.S. Capitol Police officer Brian Sicknick down the steps of the U.S Capitol, Wednesday, Feb. 3, 2021, in Washington.
Capitol_Breach_Officer_Killed_31732 Mourners pay their respects during a ceremony memorializing U.S. Capitol Police officer Brian Sicknick, as an urn with his cremated remains lies in honor on a black-draped table at the center of the Capitol Rotunda, Wednesday, Feb. 3, 2021, in Washington.
Capitol_Breach_Officer_Killed_88893 Mourners pay their respects during a ceremony memorializing U.S. Capitol Police officer Brian Sicknick, as an urn with his cremated remains lies in honor on a black-draped table at the center of the Capitol Rotunda, Wednesday, Feb. 3, 2021, in Washington.
Capitol_Breach_Officer_Killed_52146 House Speaker Nancy Pelosi of Calif., speaks during a ceremony memorializing U.S. Capitol Police officer Brian Sicknick, as an urn with his cremated remains lies in honor on a black-draped table at the center of the Capitol Rotunda, Wednesday, Feb. 3, 2021, in Washington.
Capitol_Breach_Officer_Killed_44680 An honor guard arrives for a departure ceremony after U.S. Capitol Police officer Brian Sicknick was lying in state in the Rotunda of the U.S Capitol, Wednesday, Feb. 3, 2021, in Washington.
Capitol_Breach_Officer_Killed_36343 A hearse leaves the Capitol with the cremated remains of U.S. Capitol Police officer Brian Sicknick after he was lying in honor at the U.S Capitol, Wednesday, Feb. 3, 2021, in Washington.
Capitol_Breach_Officer_Killed_79433 A hearse carrying the remains of U.S. Capitol Police officer Brian Sicknick makes its way to Arlington National Cemetery after Sicknick was lying in honor at the U.S Capitol, Wednesday, Feb. 3, 2021, in Washington.
Capitol_Breach_Officer_Killed_00270 U.S. Capitol Police officers on bicycles ride ahead of a hearse carrying the remains of U.S. Capitol Police officer Brian Sicknick as it makes its way to Arlington National Cemetery after Sicknick was lying in honor at the U.S Capitol, Wednesday, Feb. 3, 2021, in Washington.
Capitol_Breach_Officer_Killed_96442 An honor guard carries an urn with the cremated remains of U.S. Capitol Police officer Brian Sicknick down the steps of the U.S Capitol, Wednesday, Feb. 3, 2021, in Washington.
APTOPIX_Capitol_Breach_Officer_Killed_87686 A U.S. Capitol Police Officer holds a program during a ceremony memorializing U.S. Capitol Police officer Brian Sicknick, as an urn with his cremated remains lies in honor on a black-draped table at the center of the Capitol Rotunda, Wednesday, Feb. 3, 2021, in Washington.
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WASHINGTON (AP) — Congressional leaders paid tribute Wednesday to slain U.S. Capitol Police Officer Brian Sicknick in the building he died defending, promising his family and his fellow officers that they will never forget his sacrifice.

Sicknick died after an insurrectionist mob stormed the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6, interrupting the electoral count after then-President Donald Trump urged them to “fight like hell” to overturn his defeat. The U.S. Capitol Police said in a statement that Sicknick, who died the next day, was injured “while physically engaging with protesters,” though the cause of his death has not been determined.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said Sicknick was a patriot who will be remembered by lawmakers each day as they enter the Capitol. “We will never forget,” she promised his family, who attended the ceremony.

The 42-year-old officer was only the fifth person to lie in honor in the Capitol Rotunda, a designation for those who are not elected officials, judges or military leaders. President Joe Biden and Vice President Kamala Harris, along with their spouses, paid their respects during two days of visitation Tuesday and Wednesday, as did members of Congress and his fellow law enforcement officers. Both Biden, who visited Tuesday night, and Harris on Wednesday laid their hands on the urn in remembrance.

After the ceremony, Sicknick’s urn was taken out of the building as hundreds of his fellow officers lined the Capitol’s east front. They saluted his hearse as it departed for Arlington National Cemetery, where he will be interred.

The ceremony came a week before a Senate impeachment trial that will issue a verdict on Trump’s role in the riots, and as shaken members of Congress grapple with what the violence means for the future of the country and their own security. While lawmakers were largely united in denouncing the riots, and Trump’s role in them, the parties are now largely split on how to move forward. At the same time, the building has been cut off from the public, surrounded by large metal fences and defended by the National Guard.

Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer, speaking at the ceremony, talked of the deep scars left by the assault.

“Let us all be a comfort to those who continue to recover from injuries, seen and unseen, from the attack on Jan. 6,” Schumer said.

He said Sicknick was the “quiet rock” of his unit who was “caught at the wrong place at the wrong time, on a day when peace was shattered.”

Sicknick, of South River, New Jersey, enlisted in the National Guard six months after graduating high school in 1997, then deployed to Saudi Arabia and later Kyrgyzstan. He joined the Capitol Police in 2008. Like many of his fellow officers, he often worked security in the Capitol itself and was known to lawmakers, staff and others who passed through the building’s doors each morning.

The day was full of solemn ceremony and of reminders of the violence that occurred a month ago. Some of the evidence remains visible, including shattered windows and dented wood doors. Sicknick’s urn was carried through one of the entrances the rioters broke through, and groups of them paraded through the Rotunda where his ashes lay. The lawmakers who attended the ceremony — some of them wiping away tears — evacuated the House and Senate as the rioters closed in.

“Four weeks ago, the Rotunda was strewn with the debris of an insurrectionist mob,” Senate Republican leader Mitch McConnell said on the Senate floor Wednesday morning. “Today, it is adorned in solemn thanksgiving for the sacrifice of a hero.”

In addition to congressional leaders, guests at the ceremony included Defense Secretary Lloyd Austin, Army Gen. Mark Milley, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, and Washington Mayor Muriel Bowser. Also in attendance was Wenling Chestnut, widow of slain Capitol Police Officer Jacob Chestnut, one of two Capitol Police officers killed by a gunman in 1998. After viewing the urn, she walked to the side and sobbed quietly into a companion’s shoulder.

Chestnut and the other officer who was killed, John Gibson, also lay in honor after their deaths. The only other two people to have been given the same honor are civil rights leader Rosa Parks, who died in 2005, and the Rev. Billy Graham, who died in 2018.

There are still questions about Sicknick’s death, which was one of five resulting from the rioting. As the mob forced its way in, Sicknick was hit in the head with a fire extinguisher, two law enforcement officials said. He collapsed later on, was hospitalized and died. The officials could not discuss the ongoing investigation publicly and spoke to The Associated Press on the condition of anonymity.

Investigators are also examining whether he may have ingested a chemical substance during the riot that may have contributed to his death, the officials said.

The House impeached Trump for a second time a week after the attack on the charge of “incitement of insurrection.” But the Senate is likely to acquit him, with most Republicans arguing that there should not be a trial because Trump has left office and that it is time to move forward.

Democratic Sen. Dick Durbin of Illinois said on the Senate floor after the ceremony that he will remember Sicknick during the trial, and the loss that his family has endured because of Trump’s baseless claims that the election was stolen from him.

“For anyone who makes the argument that when it comes to Jan. 6 it’s time for America to get over it, I’m going to remember one police officer who gave his life to protect me and to protect this Capitol,” Durbin said.

___

Associated Press writers Michael Balsamo, Colleen Long and Darlene Superville contributed to this report.

Copyright © 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, written or redistributed.

Vice President Kamala Harris and her husband Doug Emhoff pay their respects to U.S. Capitol Police officer Brian Sicknick as an urn with his cremated remains lies in honor on a black-draped table at the center of the Capitol Rotunda, Wednesday, Feb. 3, 2021, in Washington. (Anna Moneymaker/The New York Times via AP, Pool)

Vice President Kamala Harris and her husband Doug Emhoff pay their respects to U.S. Capitol Police officer Brian Sicknick as an urn with his cremated remains lies in honor on a black-draped table at the center of the Capitol Rotunda, Wednesday, Feb. 3, 2021, in Washington. (Anna Moneymaker/The New York Times via AP, Pool)

A U.S. Capitol Police Officer holds a program during a ceremony memorializing U.S. Capitol Police officer Brian Sicknick, as an urn with his cremated remains lies in honor on a black-draped table at the center of the Capitol Rotunda, Wednesday, Feb. 3, 2021, in Washington. (Demetrius Freeman/The Washington Post via AP, Pool)

A U.S. Capitol Police Officer holds a program during a ceremony memorializing U.S. Capitol Police officer Brian Sicknick, as an urn with his cremated remains lies in honor on a black-draped table at the center of the Capitol Rotunda, Wednesday, Feb. 3, 2021, in Washington. (Demetrius Freeman/The Washington Post via AP, Pool)

Sen. Cory Booker, D-N.J., is seated during a ceremony memorializing U.S. Capitol Police officer Brian Sicknick, as an urn with his cremated remains lies in honor on a black-draped table at the center of the Capitol Rotunda, Wednesday, Feb. 3, 2021, in Washington. (Demetrius Freeman/The Washington Post via AP, Pool)

Rep. Liz Cheney, R-Wyo., attends a ceremony memorializing U.S. Capitol Police officer Brian Sicknick, as an urn with his cremated remains lies in honor on a black-draped table at the center of the Capitol Rotunda, Wednesday, Feb. 3, 2021, in Washington. (Carlos Barria/Pool via AP)

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi walks to speak during a ceremony memorializing U.S. Capitol Police officer Brian Sicknick, as an urn with his cremated remains lies in honor on a black-draped table at the center of the Capitol Rotunda, Wednesday, Feb. 3, 2021, in Washington. (Carlos Barria/Pool via AP)

Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer of New York, speaks during a ceremony memorializing U.S. Capitol Police officer Brian Sicknick, as an urn with his cremated remains lies in honor on a black-draped table at the center of the Capitol Rotunda, Wednesday, Feb. 3, 2021, in Washington. (Demetrius Freeman/The Washington Post via AP, Pool)

Member of Congress including House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy of California, left and Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky, second right, and other guests, stand during a ceremony memorializing U.S. Capitol Police officer Brian Sicknick, as an urn with his cremated remains lies in honor on a black-draped table at the center of the Capitol Rotunda, Wednesday, Feb. 3, 2021, in Washington. (Demetrius Freeman/The Washington Post via AP, Pool)

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi speaks during a ceremony memorializing U.S. Capitol Police officer Brian Sicknick, as an urn with his cremated remains lies in honor on a black-draped table at the center of the Capitol Rotunda, Wednesday, Feb. 3, 2021, in Washington. (Carlos Barria/Pool via AP)

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi speaks during a ceremony memorializing U.S. Capitol Police officer Brian Sicknick, as an urn with his cremated remains lies in honor on a black-draped table at the center of the Capitol Rotunda, Wednesday, Feb. 3, 2021, in Washington. (Carlos Barria/Pool via AP)

District of Columbia Mayor Muriel Bowser, right, and other guests, stand during a ceremony memorializing U.S. Capitol Police officer Brian Sicknick, as an urn with his cremated remains lies in honor on a black-draped table at the center of the Capitol Rotunda, Wednesday, Feb. 3, 2021, in Washington. (Demetrius Freeman/The Washington Post via AP, Pool)

Guests attend a ceremony memorializing U.S. Capitol Police officer Brian Sicknick, as an urn with his cremated remains lies in honor on a black-draped table at the center of the Capitol Rotunda, Wednesday, Feb. 3, 2021, in Washington. (Carlos Barria/Pool via AP)

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, left, Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer of New York, center, Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky, pay their last respects during a ceremony memorializing U.S. Capitol Police officer Brian Sicknick, as an urn with his cremated remains lies in honor on a black-draped table at the center of the Capitol Rotunda, Wednesday, Feb. 3, 2021, in Washington. (Demetrius Freeman/The Washington Post via AP, Pool)

Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer of New York, center, Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky, and House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy of Calif., pay their last respects during a ceremony memorializing U.S. Capitol Police officer Brian Sicknick, as an urn with his cremated remains lies in honor on a black-draped table at the center of the Capitol Rotunda, Wednesday, Feb. 3, 2021, in Washington. (Demetrius Freeman/The Washington Post via AP, Pool)

Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., pauses during a ceremony memorializing U.S. Capitol Police officer Brian Sicknick, as an urn with his cremated remains lies in honor on a black-draped table at the center of the Capitol Rotunda, Wednesday, Feb. 3, 2021, in Washington. (Demetrius Freeman/The Washington Post via AP, Pool)

People cry after a ceremony memorializing U.S. Capitol Police officer Brian Sicknick, as an urn with his cremated remains lies in honor on a black-draped table at the center of the Capitol Rotunda, Wednesday, Feb. 3, 2021, in Washington. (Demetrius Freeman/The Washington Post via AP, Pool)

Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer of N.Y., speaks during a ceremony memorializing U.S. Capitol Police officer Brian Sicknick, as an urn with his cremated remains lies in honor on a black-draped table at the center of the Capitol Rotunda, Wednesday, Feb. 3, 2021, in Washington. (Kevin Dietsch/Pool via AP)
Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer of N.Y., speaks during a ceremony memorializing U.S. Capitol Police officer Brian Sicknick, as an urn with his cremated remains lies in honor on a black-draped table at the center of the Capitol Rotunda, Wednesday, Feb. 3, 2021, in Washington. (Kevin Dietsch/Pool via AP)

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Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer of N.Y., speaks during a ceremony memorializing U.S. Capitol Police officer Brian Sicknick, as an urn with his cremated remains lies in honor on a black-draped table at the center of the Capitol Rotunda, Wednesday, Feb. 3, 2021, in Washington. (Kevin Dietsch/Pool via AP)

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