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The Latest: Hawley: Voters will soon call McCaskill ‘fired’

President Donald Trump walks to Marine One for a short flight to Andrews Air Force Base then on to a political rally in Columbia, Mo., in the lead-up to Tuesday's midterm elections, at the White House in Washington, Thursday, Nov. 1, 2018. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

COLUMBIA, Mo. (AP) — The Latest on President Donald Trump’s final rally blitz before the midterm elections (all times local):

7:45 p.m.

Missouri Republican Senate candidate Josh Hawley says that on Election Day, voters are going to call his opponent, Democratic Sen. Claire McCaskill, “fired.”

Hawley said Thursday at a rally with President Donald Trump in Columbia that McCaskill wanted Missourians to call Hillary Clinton “Madam President.” He says McCaskill has spent a lifetime in politics “just like Hillary.”

Trump says he doesn’t want anything to go awry on Tuesday, Election Day, so he’s returning to Missouri before the election to drum up votes for Hawley.

The Missouri Senate contest is one of the tightest in the nation.

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7:20 p.m.

President Donald Trump says voters must decide whether they want a booming America or want to allow the Democratic leadership in Congress and Missouri Democratic Sen. Claire McCaskill to “wipe it all away.”

He says America is thriving under Republican leadership because the GOP is putting America first.

Trump spoke Thursday night in Columbia, Missouri, in his second rally in an 11-stop, eight-state tour designed to coax Republican voters to the polls.

Trump is supporting Republican Senate candidate Josh Hawley, who is seeking to unseat McCaskill in a state Trump won by nearly 19 percentage points. Their Senate contest is one of the tightest in the nation.

At a rally on an airport tarmac, supporters waved red signs that said “Finish the Wall” and “Make America Strong Again.”

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4:45 p.m.

President Donald Trump says his administration has spent a lot of time, money and effort to make sure that Tuesday’s midterm elections are “perfect and safe” in contrast to the Russian meddling that intelligence agencies said occurred during the 2016 presidential election.

He told reporters Thursday at the White House that “there will be, hopefully, no meddling, no tampering, no nothing.”

Trump had a meeting on election security Thursday with FBI Director Chris Wray, members of the Justice Department, Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen (KEER’-sten) Nielsen and National Intelligence Director Dan Coats.

Trump criticized former President Barack Obama, saying he was told about potential Russian meddling before the 2016 election but didn’t take public actions because he thought Democrat Hillary Clinton would win the presidential election.

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4:40 p.m.

President Donald Trump says Democrat Stacey Abrams is not qualified to be Georgia’s next governor “by any stretch of the imagination.”

Trump says that based on Abrams’ past and her plans for the state, Georgia “will be in big, big trouble very quickly and the people of Georgia don’t want that.”

Trump did not go into detail Thursday about why he thinks Abrams would be bad for the state.

Abrams is seeking to become America’s first black female governor. She is a Yale-educated attorney who served a decade in the Georgia Legislature, including a stint as minority leader.

She is facing Republican Brian Kemp, who is currently secretary of state. Trump says he’s “totally qualified” and will be a “fantastic governor.”

Trump is scheduled to campaign for Kemp on Sunday in Macon, Georgia.

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4:30 p.m.

President Donald Trump is taking his immigration message to Missouri as he continues his campaign rally blitz leading up to the midterm elections.

Trump is set to appear Thursday night in Columbia, home of the state’s largest university. It will be his second rally in an 11-stop, eight-state tour designed to boost Republican turnout.

Trump is supporting Republican Senate candidate Josh Hawley, who is seeking to unseat Democratic Sen. Claire McCaskill in a state Trump won by nearly 19 percentage points.

The president has made his hard-line immigration policies the center of his closing argument, trying to raise anxiety about several caravans of Central American migrants traveling to the southern border and threatening to end the constitutionally enshrined right of birthright citizenship by executive order.

Copyright © 2018 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, written or redistributed.



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