Navigating the scrumptious world of food porn

Fleming\'s Prime Steakhouse & Wine Bar Debuts Taste the Season Two Course Prix Fixe Fresh, market flavors mark creative winter dinner. (PRNewsFoto/Fleming\'s Prime Steakhouse & Wine Bar)

Alicia Lozano, wtop.com

WASHINGTON – In a world of smartphones and tablets, food porn has become the more wholesome version of its seedier namesake. Nevermind illicit videos and not-safe-for-work websites — voyeurs now drool over pictures of pork belly and bacon.

Food porn has become so de rigueur that many eateries enforce no-photo policies. In the District, Komi continues to ban pictures. Rogue 24 has softened its stance against food photography after getting flack for requiring customers to sign a waiver promising they wouldn’t snap photos inside the restaurant.

In New York, some chefs are taking charge and offering to shoot professional photos for their shutterbug customers.

All of this points to what Cava Mezze owner and chef Dmitri Moshovitis calls “the Food Network culture,” in which everyone is suddenly an expert, critic and aficionado of culinary expression.

“We’re at the height of it right now,” he says. “People look at chefs and restaurant owners as rock stars and they follow us like rock stars.”

Social media sites like Twitter, Facebook and Instagram allow customers to have a direct line of access to their favorite personalities and restaurants. Curious about what celebrity chef Jamie Oliver is cooking up in his kitchen? You’re in luck:


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