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USADA chief: Armstrong has evidence against UCI

Thursday - 4/25/2013, 6:49pm  ET

The head of the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency, Travis Tygart, right, speaks with former French anti-doping agency (AFLD) president Pierre Bordry, left, before a senate-led inquiry into the fight against doping in Paris, France, Thursday, April 25, 2013. USADA produced a scathing report detailing systematic doping by Lance Armstrong and his teams, which led to Armstrong being stripped of his seven Tour titles and banned from elite sport for life. (AP Photo/Francois Mori)

JEROME PUGMIRE
AP Sports Writer

PARIS (AP) -- The head of the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency wants Lance Armstrong to come forward with information detailing the alleged complicity of cycling's governing body in his doping.

Travis Tygart appeared at a French government hearing in Paris on Thursday to discuss ways to improve the fight against doping.

After the USADA'S scathing report on systematic doping by Armstrong and his teams, he was stripped of his seven Tour de France titles and banned from elite sport for life.

Cycling body UCI has been accused of covering up suspicious samples from Armstrong, accepting financial donations from him and helping him avoid detection in doping tests. It denied those accusations in a statement Thursday.

During the French Senate hearing, Tygart said he had "evidence of the UCI's involvement in this affair," and Armstrong could hold the key to revealing the extent of that involvement.

"Armstrong led us to believe -- during the course of our interaction with him -- that he had evidence of their complicity in this situation, and of course we've developed additional information that will come out through our process, that I can't comment on right now," Tygart said in an interview with The Associated Press.

Tygart, who said he last spoke with Armstrong about a month ago, hopes the rider changes his mind and details what happened during his reign as cycling's undisputed superstar.

"We're hopeful at some point he'll come in and be truthful. I think he could provide a lot of information," Tygart told the AP after speaking before the Senate for about 1
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