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Thursday's Sports In Brief

Friday - 2/8/2013, 4:28am  ET

The Associated Press

SEATTLE (AP) -- BASEBALL

Felix Hernandez and the Seattle Mariners are working on a $175 million, seven-year contract that would make him the highest-paid pitcher in baseball, according to a person with knowledge of the deal's details.

The person spoke to The Associated Press Thursday on condition of anonymity because the agreement had not been completed. USA Today first reported the deal. Seattle would add $134.5 million of guaranteed money over five years to the contract of the 2010 AL Cy Young Award winner, whose current agreement calls for him to receive $40.5 million over the next two seasons.

Hernandez's total dollars would top CC Sabathia's original $161 million, seven-year contract with the New York Yankees and his $25 million average would surpass Zack Greinke's $24.5 million under his new contract with the Los Angeles Dodgers.

CORAL GABLES, Fla. (AP) -- None of the past 10,000 drug tests performed on student-athletes at Miami has shown a positive result for anabolic steroids, university officials said.

The statement came amid reports that the Hurricanes' baseball program has been linked to a Major League Baseball investigation into performance-enhancing drug use and if they got those products from an anti-aging clinic in South Florida.

TORONTO (AP) -- Still waiting for Cooperstown, Tim Raines can say he's a Hall of Famer.

The former Montreal Expos outfielder was selected for induction into the Canadian Baseball of Fame. Also included in the class of 2013 are former outfielders George Bell and Rob Ducey as well as former announcer Tom Cheek and longtime minor league owner Nat Bailey.

No players were elected into baseball's Hall of Fame this year by the Baseball Writers' Association of America. Raines was fifth in BBWAA balloting with 297 votes (52.2 percent), well short of the 75 percent required for induction.

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CYCLING

AUSTIN, Texas (AP) -- A Dallas promotions company sued Lance Armstrong, demanding he repay $12 million in bonuses and fees it paid him for winning the Tour de France.

SCA Promotions had tried in a 2005 legal dispute over the bonuses to prove Armstrong cheated to win before it ultimately settled and paid him.

Armstrong recently acknowledged using performance-enhancing drugs after the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency in 2012 detailed a sophisticated doping program by his Armstrong's teams. Armstrong was stripped of his seven Tour de France victories and given a lifetime ban from sports. Now, the company contends in its lawsuit, Armstrong and agent Bill Stapleton lied and conspired to cheat SCA out of millions.

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FOOTBALL

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) -- Gregg Williams thanked NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell for reinstating him and he also apologized while taking "full responsibility" for his role in the New Orleans Saints' bounty scandal.

The NFL reinstated Williams on Thursday morning, and the Tennessee Titans hired him as a senior defensive assistant.

The league issued a statement saying that Goodell cited several reasons for reinstating Williams, including Williams accepting responsibility for his role in the bounty program, his commitment to never be involved in any pay for performance system and pledging to teach safe play and respect for the rules. Williams, suspended indefinitely last March, is the last person involved in the scandal to be reinstated by league. New Orleans coach Sean Payton had his suspension lifted on Jan. 22.

EDEN PRAIRIE, Minn. (AP) -- Adrian Peterson put up one of the best seasons by a running back in NFL history to run away with the MVP award. Now imagine what he could do if he was actually fully healthy.

Peterson had surgery to repair a sports hernia in his abdomen, an injury that bothered him for much of the last month of the season while he came up just 8 yards short of Eric Dickerson's single-season rushing record.

WASHINGTON (AP) -- The Washington Redskins are taking a beating at the Smithsonian.

The team's nickname -- deemed by many as an offensive term toward Native Americans -- was a prime topic of discussion at a daylong symposium Thursday at the National Museum of the American Indian.

Washington, D.C., native and University of North Florida professor E. Newton Jackson got a round of applause from the packed auditorium when he said he stopped using the nickname decades ago. Other nicknames and mascots also came under scrutiny, including a red-skinned image named "Mr. Yakoo" used by a high school in Massachusetts.

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PENN STATE

HARRISBURG, Pa. (AP) -- The NCAA said a judge should throw out the federal antitrust lawsuit the governor filed against it over Penn State's $60 million fine and other penalties resulting from the Jerry Sandusky child molestation scandal.

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