Comment
0
Tweet
0
Print
RSS Feeds

Child porn victim surprised by court ruling tossing out $3.4 million judgment

Wednesday - 4/23/2014, 4:21pm  ET

WASHINGTON (AP) -- A woman whose rape as a child by her uncle was seen in images that were viewed extensively on the Internet says she's "surprised and confused" by a ruling today from the Supreme Court. That's according to a statement her lawyer posted online.

The court today tossed out a judgment of nearly $3.4 million -- money that was supposed to be paid to the woman by a man whose computer was found to contain two of the images. The court says federal law limits how much money the victims of child porn can collect from people who viewed the material.

The case involved a woman known in court papers by the pseudonym "Amy." Her losses for psychological care, lost income and attorneys' fees were assessed based on the ongoing Internet trade and the viewing of images of her being raped when she was 8 and 9 years old.

Justice Anthony Kennedy said lower courts went too far when they said the man who was found to have the images on his computer was responsible for all of the woman's losses, without determining how much harm he caused her.

A federal judge will now work out what that amount should be.

Advocates for child porn victims argue that holding defendants liable for the entire amount of losses reflects the ongoing harm that victims suffer each time someone views the images online.

%@AP Links

197-v-34-(Jerry Bodlander, AP correspondent)--The Supreme Court says there are limits to the restitution that victims of child pornography can receive. AP correspondent Jerry Bodlander reports. (23 Apr 2014)

<

198-c-24-(Jerry Bodlander, AP correspondent)-"of her losses"-AP correspondent Jerry Bodlander reports the justices threw out a multi-million dollar award. (23 Apr 2014)

<

APPHOTO WX109: FILE - This Oct. 13, 2013 file photo shows Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy speaking in Philadelphia. The Supreme Court on Wednesday said a federal law limits how much money victims of child pornography can recover from people who viewed their images online, throwing out a nearly $3.4 million judgment in favor of a woman whose childhood rape has been widely seen on the Internet. Kennedy said for the court that federal judges should exercise discretion in awarding restitution. The case involved a woman known in court papers by the pseudonym "Amy." Her losses have been pegged at nearly $3.4 million, based on the ongoing Internet trade and viewing of images of her being raped by her uncle when she was 8 and 9 years old. (AP Photo/Matt Slocum, File) (3 Oct 2013)

<
Copyright 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.