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Kenyans urged to spend British pay wisely

Thursday - 7/4/2013, 12:00pm  ET

In this photos taken on Wedesday, June 19, 2013 in Endana, Kenya Kipise Lourolkeek, 53, at his home turns on his battery-powered TV. After being compensated for the injuries he received as a child from a blast from an explosive left behind by British soldiers troops who trained in Kenya. Kipise Lourolkeek, 53, Maasai elder who as a young herdsman in the 1970s was injured by an exploding object that he picked up in the plains. As some 5,200 Kenyans wait to get paid by Britain for colonial-era acts of torture, herdsmen from Kenya's Samburu and Maasai tribes like Lourolkeek, who once benefited from similar payments . (AP Photo/Tom Odulla)

TOM ODULA
Associated Press

ENDANA, Kenya (AP) -- As some 5,200 Kenyans wait to get paid by Britain for colonial-era acts of torture, herdsmen from Kenya's Samburu and Maasai tribes who once benefited from similar payments have some advice: Don't squander the money like we did.

Some of the herdsmen embraced polygamy, others bought new cars they did not know how to drive. Eleven years later, the Kenyan tribesmen compensated by Britain --as the victims of explosives left behind by British soldiers in training-- say they regret their failure to spend the cash responsibly.

"I cannot calculate the amount of money I spent on alcohol," said Kipise Lourolkeek, 53, a Maasai elder who as a young herdsman in the 1970s was injured by an exploding object that he picked up in the plains.

In August 2002 Lourolkeek was one of more than 220 victims of British ordnance, including mines, who won an out-of-court settlement from the British government of
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