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'Bless my Hotshot crew': Survivor speaks at vigil

Wednesday - 7/10/2013, 5:47am  ET

Brendan McDonough, the only surviving member of his crew, receives a hug from Vice President Joe Biden during the "Our Fallen Brothers" memorial service for the 19 fallen firefighters at Tim's Toyota Center in Prescott Valley, Ariz. on Tuesday, July 9, 2013. Prescott's Granite Mountain Hotshots were overrun by smoke and fire while battling a blaze on a ridge in Yarnell, about 80 miles northwest of Phoenix on June 30, 2013. (AP Photo/The Arizona Republic, David Kadlubowski , Pool)
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FELICIA FONSECA
Associated Press

PRESCOTT VALLEY, Ariz. (AP) -- On a day filled with speeches from dignitaries including the vice president, the words of the lone survivor of a fire crew overrun by flames resonated deepest in an arena packed with firefighters from around the nation.

A stone-faced Brendan McDonough walked onto the stage at the end of the service and offered what's called "The Hot Shot's Prayer," calmly reciting the words: "For if this day on the line I should answer death's call, Lord, bless my Hotshot crew, my family, one and all."

He concluded by telling the crowd: "Thank you. And I miss my brothers."

McDonough spoke at a memorial for the 19 members of the Prescott-based Granite Mountain Hotshots who died June 30 when a wind-fueled, out-of-control fire overran them as they tried to protect a former gold-mining town from the inferno.

Vice President Joe Biden called them "men of uncommon valor" while thanking God that one crew member survived.

"There's an old saying: All men are created equal, and then a few became firefighters," Biden said. "Thank God for you all."

The event was marked by an outpouring of support from several thousand firefighters from across the country, who traveled to the Prescott area to honor their fallen brethren.

They talked about how firefighters are accustomed to answering the call of duty when the alarm sounds and sends them into harm's way, whether it's a fire in a forest or a home. And they noted that the same can be said when a fellow firefighter dies.

"When you hear of a death, especially a group of firefighters, and there's 19 that we're here to mourn, there's no question that at the drop of a hat you do what you can to go and support the fire service and their families," said Capt. Steve Brown of the Rancho Cucamonga Fire Protection District, who brought 17 others in his department of 85 uniformed firefighters from California.

The memorial in Prescott Valley began with a choir singing "On Eagle's Wings." Homeland Security Secretary and former Arizona Gov. Janet Napolitano looked on, as did Sen. John McCain and his wife, Cindy, and other members of the state's congressional delegation.

Biden talked about the 1972 death of his wife and young daughter in a traffic crash, and how firefighters freed his sons from the mangled wreckage.

"I don't have the privilege of knowing any of these heroes personally, but I know them. I know them because they saved the lives of my two sons," Biden told the crowd. He also said firefighters rushed him to a hospital after he suffered an aneurysm in 1998. And he credited firefighters with saving his wife Jill after lightning once struck their home.

Gov. Jan Brewer praised people around the country for responding as she hoped they would -- with candlelight vigils, financial contributions, prayers, and flowers and notes placed at makeshift memorials.

"Of course our hearts are filled with profound sadness today, but they're also filled with great pride," she said. "How wonderful is it to know that Arizona was home to 19 men like those we honor today."

Outside the minor league hockey arena, each of the 19 firefighters was represented by a U.S. flag and a purple ribbon with his name. A granite marker read: "In honor and recognition of all wildland firefighters across this great nation. Duty - Respect - Integrity."

Inside, 19 sets of firefighting gear lined the front of the stage, including commemorative Pulaski tools similar to the ones the elite crew uses to dig lines around fires.

Prescott Fire Chief Dan Fraijo gave the tools to the firefighters' families, along with flags that had been flown in the men's honor.

Roughly 8,000 people attended the memorial, most inside, while several thousand watched it outside on jumbo screens. Alumni of the Granite Mountain Hotshots sat inside in the front rows.

Darrell Willis, a Prescott Fire Department division chief, said he traveled with the crew a couple of years ago when they fought a fire in Colorado. On the way back, the unit stopped in Glenwood Springs and then climbed Storm King Mountain, where 14 firefighters died in 1994.

"We spent the entire sunny summer afternoon evaluating, studying, talking about what happened there 19 years ago," Willis said. "They were truly committed to never letting something like this ever happen again. They were committed to returning to you after every assignment. But there was another plan."

The highly specialized crew was part of a small community of Hotshots nationwide. There are only about 110 of the 20-person teams, mostly stationed west of the Mississippi River.

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