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Every president since Theodore Roosevelt has left his signature in St. Johns Episcopal Churchs Presidents Pen book. (WTOPMegan Cloherty)
Every president since Theodore Roosevelt has left his signature in St. John's Episcopal Church's President's Pen book. (WTOP/Megan Cloherty)
The Presidents Pen book is held in the churchs archives for safe keeping. Given the signatures inside, one can understand why. (WTOPMegan Cloherty)
The President's Pen book is held in the church's archives for safe keeping. Given the signatures inside, one can understand why. (WTOP/Megan Cloherty)
Alice Roosevelt Longworth signed the Presidents Pen book for her father, President Theodore Roosevelt. Below, President Woodrow Wilsons name is signed by his wife Edith Bolling WIlson. (WTOPMegan Cloherty)
Alice Roosevelt Longworth signed the President's Pen book for her father, President Theodore Roosevelt. Below, President Woodrow Wilson's name is signed by his wife Edith Bolling WIlson. (WTOP/Megan Cloherty)
Both presidents Bush and Obama attended service at St. Johns on their inauguration days. President Bill Clinton chose to attend services at Metropolitan AME Church. (WTOPMegan Cloherty)
Both presidents Bush and Obama attended service at St. John's on their inauguration days. President Bill Clinton chose to attend services at Metropolitan AME Church. (WTOP/Megan Cloherty)
Inside St. Johns Episcopal Church, which will host President Barack Obama and Vice President Joe Biden on Inauguration Day 2013. (WTOPMegan Cloherty)
Inside St. John's Episcopal Church, which will host President Barack Obama and Vice President Joe Biden on Inauguration Day 2013. (WTOP/Megan Cloherty)
St. Johns executive director Hayden Bryan sits in the churchs front parlor. St. Johns was built from 1815 to 1816. Next door, the former clerk of the House of Representatives Matthew St. Clair Clarke built a home in 1837, but he went bankrupt doing it. (WTOPMegan Cloherty)
St. John's executive director Hayden Bryan sits in the church's front parlor. St. John's was built from 1815 to 1816. Next door, the former clerk of the House of Representatives Matthew St. Clair Clarke built a home in 1837, but he went bankrupt doing it. (WTOP/Megan Cloherty)
The house, now attached to the church, was once leased by William Wilson Corcoran and lived in by Lord Ashburton while negotiating the Webster-Ashburton treaty. (WTOPMegan Cloherty)
The house, now attached to the church, was once leased by William Wilson Corcoran and lived in by Lord Ashburton while negotiating the Webster-Ashburton treaty. (WTOP/Megan Cloherty)
Bryan sits in the Presidents Pew to show where it is located in the nave. The pew was chosen by the vestry committee of the church for President James Madison shortly after it was built. (WTOPMegan Cloherty)
Bryan sits in the President's Pew to show where it is located in the nave. The pew was chosen by the vestry committee of the church for President James Madison shortly after it was built. (WTOP/Megan Cloherty)
Fingerprints tend to smudge the brass placard identifying the Presidents Pew which has been visited by each sitting president since James Madison. (WTOPMegan Cloherty)
Fingerprints tend to smudge the brass placard identifying the President's Pew which has been visited by each sitting president since James Madison. (WTOP/Megan Cloherty)
The kneeling pillows in the Presidents Pew. The tradition is for each president to kneel on James Madisons pillow since he was the pews original owner. (WTOPMegan Cloherty)
The kneeling pillows in the President's Pew. The tradition is for each president to kneel on James Madison's pillow since he was the pew's original "owner." (WTOP/Megan Cloherty)
Known as Lincolns Pew, its the last seat in the back of the churchs southeast corner. This is where President Lincoln was known to sneak in for evening prayer during the Civil War, cramming his 6-foot-5-inch frame into the small space as not to disturb the on-going service. (WTOPMegan Cloherty)
Known as ''Lincoln's Pew,'' it's the last seat in the back of the church's southeast corner. This is where President Lincoln was known to sneak in for evening prayer during the Civil War, cramming his 6-foot-5-inch frame into the small space as not to disturb the on-going service. (WTOP/Megan Cloherty)
The sign identifying Lincolns Pew says the President would arrive quietly and leave before the service ended to walk back to the White House. (WTOPMegan Cloherty)
The sign identifying ''Lincoln's Pew'' says the ''President would arrive quietly and leave before the service ended to walk back to the White House.'' (WTOP/Megan Cloherty)
The house, now attached to St. Johns, was once leased by William Wilson Corcoran and lived in by Lord Ashburton for 10 months while he negotiated the Webster-Ashburton treaty. (WTOPMegan Cloherty)
The house, now attached to St. John's, was once leased by William Wilson Corcoran and lived in by Lord Ashburton for 10 months while he negotiated the Webster-Ashburton treaty. (WTOP/Megan Cloherty)
On Monday, preparations were underway in and around the National Cathedral in anticipation of the Inaugural Prayer Service on Jan. 22. (WTOPMegan Cloherty)
On Monday, preparations were underway in and around the National Cathedral in anticipation of the Inaugural Prayer Service on Jan. 22. (WTOP/Megan Cloherty)
President Lincolns statue inside the National Cathedral sits beneath a window designed to reflect the colors of the Civil War. (WTOPMegan Cloherty)
President Lincoln's statue inside the National Cathedral sits beneath a window designed to reflect the colors of the Civil War. (WTOP/Megan Cloherty)
Cathedral planners chose to incorporate Lincolns bay into the design of the nave because he unified the country. (WTOPMegan Cloherty)
Cathedral planners chose to incorporate ''Lincoln's bay'' into the design of the nave because he unified the country. (WTOP/Megan Cloherty)
Looking into President Washingtons bay at the National Cathedral where the stained glass window above him portrays a tree growing out of fire. (WTOPMegan Cloherty)
Looking into President ''Washington's bay'' at the National Cathedral where the stained glass window above him portrays a tree growing out of fire. (WTOP/Megan Cloherty)
President Washingtons gaze seems to fall on the wall in front of him, but if a visitor stands next to the statue, he or she will see a narrow window that designers meant for only Washington to see. The window was designed to represent the attributes of Washingtons mother and wife Martha. (WTOPMegan Cloherty)
President Washington's gaze seems to fall on the wall in front of him, but if a visitor stands next to the statue, he or she will see a narrow window that designers meant for only Washington to see. The window was designed to represent the attributes of Washington's mother and wife Martha. (WTOP/Megan Cloherty)
President Woodrow Wilsons tomb sits in the National Cathedral. Wilson was originally interred in the bottom level in the Bethlehem Chapel, but he was moved in 1956 to the Wilson Memorial Bay in the main cathedral. (WTOPMegan Cloherty)
President Woodrow Wilson's tomb sits in the National Cathedral. Wilson was originally interred in the bottom level in the Bethlehem Chapel, but he was moved in 1956 to the Wilson Memorial Bay in the main cathedral. (WTOP/Megan Cloherty)
The presidential seal is carved into the front of President Wilsons tomb facing the nave. It is flanked by the seals of Princeton University and the state of New Jersey, where Wilson went to school and where he served as governor. (WTOPMegan Cloherty)
The presidential seal is carved into the front of President Wilson's tomb facing the nave. It is flanked by the seals of Princeton University and the state of New Jersey, where Wilson went to school and where he served as governor. (WTOP/Megan Cloherty)
Wilson is the only president buried in Washington, D.C. (WTOPMegan Cloherty)
Wilson is the only president buried in Washington, D.C. (WTOP/Megan Cloherty)
The first inaugural address was given in 1793 by George Washington upon the start of his second term during a ceremony in Philadelphia. It was only 135 words, the shortest in history, according to inaugural.senate.gov. (WTOPMegan Cloherty)
The first inaugural address was given in 1793 by George Washington upon the start of his second term during a ceremony in Philadelphia. It was only 135 words, the shortest in history, according to inaugural.senate.gov. (WTOP/Megan Cloherty)
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